Smallwood Primary School and
Language Unit

Computing

 

At Smallwood Primary School we embrace current and emerging technologies to facilitate the learning experience of the whole school community. We aim for our children to be confident, competent and discerning users of digital technology which will prepare them for participation in a rapidly changing world. 

Computing Curriculum

I like my computing lessons because we have been learning about moving giving instructions to characters.

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Computing Curriculum 2014

In line with Naace and ‘Computing at School’ guidance, we have divided the curriculum into three core areas: 

  • Computer Science (CS) – “[children] are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through programming”.
  • Information Technology (IT) – building on their knowledge and understanding of Computer Science, pupils are “equipped to create programs, systems and a range of content”.
  • Digital Literacy (DL) – providing children with the ability to “use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a suitable level for the future workplace and active participants in a digital world”. 

I have loved making a website about Vikings.  I can put everything I'm learning online.

Online Safety Reminders

Whilst the internet and technology can really help us educate our pupils, it's crucially important that we ensure all children stay safe and are protected from online harm.

  • Try to support your child during learning time so you can see what they are doing.  Ask them to work in an open space, not in a bedroom or behind closed doors.
  • Have regular conversations about online safety and encourage them to share their online experiences with you.
  • Don't only rely on internet filters to monitor websites - an adult should also be monitoring online activity.

The Children's Commission have produced a useful guide based on NHS’s evidence-based ‘‘five steps to better mental wellbeing’, the digital 5 a day campaign gives children and parents easy to follow, practical steps to achieve a healthy and balanced digital diet.

Thinkuknow is the education programme from NCA-CEOP, a UK organisation which protects children both online and offline.

Explore one of the six Thinkuknow websites for advice about staying safe when you're on a phone, tablet or computer.

Useful Computing Websites

BBC Computing website

The National Museum of Computing

National Association of Advisors for Computers in Education

Computing at School

National crime agency with a focus on online protection